Saturday, December 08, 2018

Friday, December 07, 2018

But everything is still there!


Windows Mobile devices had non-volatile memory, which, if you think about devices today, seems obvious, but back then it really wasn't. Many of Palm's devices up to OS5 didn't have non-volatile memory, so if you let the batteries go flat you had to restore from a back up!

That battery really is flat!


So the Treo lives again


For a while there I wasn't sure it was going to power up at all, but it has!

And another 'last thought' on Windows Mobile

Another thing came to me that I wanted to mention. Whilst Palm OS got used in the Handspring devices, you never had the same kind of modular hardware appear for Windows Mobile, which I think was a missed trick really, and a shame.

I think that could have been very cool indeed.

A last thought on Windows Mobile ...

Ok, perhaps not quite a complete last thought, but one more thing that occurred to me after yesterday's WM fest. One of the things that WM was obviously very good at was integrating with Microsoft's Office suite, at least the versions back in the days when WM was around.

That was of course something that it really had over Palm OS. Palm never had that deep integration that WM could achieve much easier, and that was of course why it was simpler to utilise in enterprise environments.

Thursday, December 06, 2018

Some of my favourite Windows Mobile user interfaces: 10






Ok. That's probably all for now on interfaces. I think I've made my point.

Some of my favourite Windows Mobile user interfaces: 9




Some of my favourite Windows Mobile user interfaces: 8


Some of my favourite Windows Mobile user interfaces: 7


Some of my favourite Windows Mobile user interfaces: 6


Some of my favourite Windows Mobile user interfaces: 5


Some of my favourite Windows Mobile user interfaces: 4


Some of my favourite Windows Mobile user interfaces: 3


Some of my favourite Windows Mobile user interfaces: 2


Some of my favourite Windows Mobile user interfaces: 1


Having said that I liked the user interface design in Windows Mobile I thought I'd post a few of my favourite examples of it.

Building 'apps' on Windows Mobile


A bit like iziBasic and ViziBasic on the Palm OS, Basic4ppc was good although to make a full 'app' you needed to use the desktop too.

An operating system needs windows


One of the other things I really liked about Windows Mobile was the use of windows in the user interface. I know it was a little thing, but I just liked it.

Windows Mobile and a more personal user interface


One thing I always liked about Windows Mobile was how you could adapt the user interface to suit you. Some of the customisation was built in to the OS and other elements had to be supported by 3rd party apps. Either way, it made for a more personal experience and I think that's something that's lacking in modern interfaces.

Windows Mobile and the desktop


Of course, like all PDAs back in the day, there was a strong connection with the desktop. Windows Mobile devices were very good at talking to Windows on the desktop as you can see here.

And the Axim again


Just a nice photo of it that I thought I'd add as we're talking about Windows Mobile today.

My old Axim


This has been my primary Windows Mobile device for a long time now. It replaced an HP Jornada 568 which was in fact my very first WM device. The Axim has been brilliant and has always served my purposes very well indeed.

This was a more common feature of Windows Mobile


This device wasn't a laptop, it was a way to use your Windows Mobile device on a bigger screen and with a keyboard. A great idea, and one that shows that the Windows Mobile OS was far more targeted at the business user.

Actually, a few thoughts on Windows Mobile ...

It is in fact one of those areas that I don't think I've properly done justice here, at least not for a long time now, and that is almost certainly in need of rectifying.

It was of course, one of the more popular mobile operating systems back in the day, and, because it was Microsoft, it was more heavily adopted in the corporate / enterprise world than Palm was.

Most of the stuff I've covered on Windows Mobile has been creative stuff, but of course you could do loads more with it. It was very functional indeed. So perhaps it's about time to take a few moments to look at it in more depth, and also look at some of the devices that used this OS.

Once again I've pulled this out to have a look at it ...


I've got it into my head that it could be the ideal PDA for me (again). This is mostly due to the fact that I can't remember why it didn't work out so well last time around!

Wednesday, December 05, 2018

So, it's a phone, for your phone?


It's taken me a while to decide whether or not to talk about this, but I think it is worth saying. This is a terrible idea. It's a phone for people who don't want to take their existing, slightly larger phone, out with them. That's it. That is Palm's big new idea.

Well that is truly pathetic in my opinion.

I had hoped that the brand could stand for something a little better than this, but apparently not. It is a competitor for smartwatches, and not even in a good way. This is a proposition that says "Don't just own one phone when you can own two". Why? It makes no sense at all!

If I'm wrong and it's a great success, then fine, but I wouldn't be surprised if this dies out pretty quick.

The shame of it is that it's a missed opportunity for the brand.

Never mind!

Tuesday, December 04, 2018

There's even Palm stuff on Pinterest

If you're a pinterest user you can find the Palmorama pinterest board here. I add stuff to it occasionally, so it's worth checking every once in a while to see if there's anything new.

Sunday, December 02, 2018